Greg LeMond, Marianne Vos, Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen to be inducted into the Cycling Hall of Fame

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The Cycling Hall of Fame welcomes a new class of special icons celebrated for what they have accomplished and given to the world of cycling. Welcome Greg LeMond, Marianne Vos and Paul Sherwen & Phil Liggett

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Photographs: Offside-L'Equipe

Rouleur readers have been voting all year for the next men’s rider, women’s rider and patron to be inducted into the Cycling Hall of Fame. The polls have now closed and we have our results.


Three worthier winners we could not have found and we’re delighted to have one of them collecting their trophy, manufactured by Reynolds, at the Rouleur Classic 2019.


Read: How Reynolds created the Cycling Hall of Fame trophy

Greg LeMond



Ian Cleverly’s “Case for” article began by describing Greg LeMond as an “innovator, trailblazer, the man who introduced a nation to bike racing and transformed the peloton singlehandedly”. In truth, if there was anyone for whom an argument didn’t need to be made, it was the first – and still only – American to win the Tour de France.


LeMond takes his place in the Cycling Hall of Fame alongside the Cannibal, Eddy Merckx, who was inducted at last year’s Rouleur Classic. It is rightful reward for an individual who not only achieved a huge amount on the bike, but one who has been put through the ringer over the years – and survived.


From the battles with his team-mate, Bernard Hinault, to the infamous hunting accident of 1989, to the dark decade which saw him alienated from the sport of cycling, all for standing up for himself, and his principles, when no-one else would.


Greg LeMond will accept his Cycling Hall of Fame trophy in person, on Thursday, October 31, 2019 at the Rouleur Classic.


Read: The Cycling Hall of Fame – The case for Greg LeMond


Final results: 1. Greg LeMond 2. Fausto Coppi 3. Bernard Hinault




The only active rider on any of our shortlists, Marianne Vos puts the exception in exceptional. There’s no sign that her powers are waning, either. The three-time World Champion notched up 16 individual victories in 2019, including La Course by the Tour de France.


“I am honoured to be voted to be the winner,” she told Rouleur, on hearing of her induction into the Cycling Hall of Fame. “When I look at the other names on the shortlist it’s incredible to win. I see it as a big celebration of my whole career, though I hope to still go on, to top it with some good results. I’m still enjoying it.”


Read: The Cycling Hall of Fame – The case for Marianne Vos


Final results: 1. Marianne Vos 2. Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli 3. Nicole Cooke


Inseparable for more than thirty years in the commentary box, we couldn’t bring ourselves to split them for our Cycling Hall of Fame shortlist either. Paul Sherwen’s death last year came as a great shock to cycling, but was met with an enormous outpouring of love.


The entire sport came together and rallied round to share not only its appreciation for Sherwen, but for the surviving member of the partnership, Phil Liggett. For many their voices were cycling, reaching beyond the obsessive to convey the Tour de France to the casual viewer as well.


“It’s been an incredibly sad year for me to work after what would have been our 34th year together,” said Liggett, upon being told of his induction by Rouleur columnist, Ned Boulting. “We were the longest running duo in television, on any sport, around the world, and Paul was always the first to remind me of that.


“He’s not here, but the outpouring of love since he did pass away… he had no idea how much people liked him. He would have been a great recipient of this award and I would have been alongside him.”


Read: The Cycling Hall of Fame – The case for Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen


Final results: 1. Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen 2. Tullio Campagnolo 3. Patrick Lefevere


Congratulations to the winners of all three categories.


Members of the Cycling Hall of Fame as of October 2019


Eddy Merckx
Greg LeMond

Beryl Burton
Marianne Vos

Ernesto Colnago
Phil Liggett and Paul Sherwen